My Plans for a Spooky, Sugar-Free Halloween

My Plans for a Spooky, Sugar-Free Halloween

Friday, October 20th, 2017, My Story

Author: Laura J.

Halloween was tricky to manage last year for my daughter, Gabrielle, who has sucrose intolerance. I let her go trick-or-treating with her friends, but like all 9-year-olds, they were only interested in collecting as much candy as they could. Her friends ate so much candy! Not wanting to feel left out, Gabrielle ate a chocolate bar, but then she had gas, bloating, and diarrhea the rest of the evening. Not fun.

This year, I’m going to make sure Gabrielle and six of her BFFs have a Halloween they’ll all enjoy. I’ve also volunteered to supervise trick-or-treating so that I can keep an eye on things. I’m going to suggest they stick to eating two treats and take the rest home. Gabrielle and I have a little secret: I’m going to tuck two Sugar-Free Meringue Ghosts and Bones into her bag with special wrapping, so she doesn’t feel left out when they all eat their treats.

Low Sucrose Veggie Skeleton

Check out My Sucrose-Free Halloween Plans

  1. Dressing Up. Pretending to be a scary or famous character is a big part of Halloween fun. I’m going to dress up, too, and set the scene with some ridiculous, stripy, witch table-leg covers; scary music; and strings of orange and purple lights throughout the house.
  2. Pumpkin Carving. Kids love designing and digging in to make their jack-o-lanterns. As a bonus, I’m going to roast pumpkin seeds for a delicious, sugar-free snack.
  3. A Spooky Dinner. I can’t wait to see the kids’ faces when they see what I’m serving! I’m making a sugar-free Jello brain and a veggie skeleton. Kids love to pretend, so I’m going to call Peanut Butter Mud Cake “dirt in a cup” and green grapes will be “lizard eyeballs.” These Everything Bagel Dogs will make great mummy hot dogs after I add a few dabs of mustard for faces. I bet more than one kid will scream when I read The Hairy Toe and then serve sucrose-free kosher hotdogs cut up into pieces and tossed in soy sauce!
  4. Snitch Witch. Like the tooth fairy, she flies in at night while children sleep and trades their candy for toys. Gabrielle can still have fun trick-or-treating with her friends and then will be thrilled to have some cool toys the next day instead.
  5. Shelling out Sugar-Free Treats. This year, I’m loading a divided tray with glow in the dark bracelets, Halloween-colored Play-Doh, scary spider stickers, driveway chalk, movie passes, and some free admission tickets for swimming at our local recreation center. Kids can choose which treat they’d like.

I wonder who is going to have the most fun this year – me or Gabrielle?

 

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