Eight Sneaky Foods That Contain Sucrose

Eight Sneaky Foods That Contain Sucrose

Eight Sneaky Foods That Contain Sucrose

Sucrose is most commonly known as “sugar” or “table sugar,” but if you’re trying to avoid it, unfortunately it’s not as simple as steering clear of the sugar packets you put in your morning coffee! In fact, sucrose sneaks its way into many foods commonly found in your fridge and pantry.

Whether you’re cutting back for personal health reasons, or think you may have Sucrose Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID), you might be shocked to find that these eight sneaky food groups may contain sucrose.

Eight Sneaky Foods That Contain Sucrose

  1. Fruit: They say, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away;” but that’s not the case for someone with Sucrose Intolerance caused by CSID, since the disease affects your ability to digest sucrose. It may surprise you to know sucrose occurs naturally in some fruits and fruit juices like bananas, oranges, pineapple and yes – apples!
  2. Spices and Seasonings: Many spices may contain sugar or starch fillers, so read the labels carefully. Work with your doctor or registered dietitian to come up with a diet that works for you.
  3. Vegetables: Just because veggies are good for you doesn’t mean they’re right for everyone, including those with Sucrose Intolerance caused by CSID. A few vegetables, such as carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, and corn actually contain sucrose and may need to be avoided.
  4. Whole Grain Cereal: It is important to read food labels carefully, because even some “healthy,” whole-grain products like breakfast cereals may have added sugars, including sucrose.
  5. Lunch Meats: Processed meats such as bacon, sausage, and deli meat are often cured with sucrose or have starch fillers. That’s why it’s so important to read the label! These foods should be avoided until the appropriate sucrose and starch tolerance levels have been established for you.
  6. Lemonade: Steer clear of store-bought lemonade. Instead, make your own limeade or lemonade with fresh juice, and fructose or dextrose if you’d like to add a little sweetness.
  7. Condiments: Sucrose often sneaks its way into common household condiments and sauces like store-bought ketchup, BBQ sauce, dressings, and spaghetti sauce. Homemade options like DIY spaghetti sauce or vinaigrette made without any added sugar are a much better choice.
  8. White Bread: Believe it or not, white bread is often loaded with added sugar! Instead, choose carbohydrates that are higher in fiber, which slows down the rate of digestion. These carbs include quinoa, lentils, and brown rice.

Keep in mind: everyone’s symptoms are different, so it’s important to work with your healthcare provider and a registered dietitian to come up with a diet that works best for you.

Now that you’re more aware of foods that contain sucrose, you may decide to clean out your pantry and fridge to make room for sucrose-free alternatives! To further discuss your diet and test if you may have a Sucrose Intolerance caused by CSID*, we recommend you make an appointment with your doctor to evaluate your symptoms.

*This quiz is not a diagnostic.

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Sucrose Intolerance May Be More Common Than You Think