What You Need To Know About Sucrose Intolerance

I Am Not a Unicorn

Sucrose Intolerance may be more common than you think. Children with Sucrose Intolerance face some unique challenges related to their growth and development. Is it time to talk to your doctor about Sucrose Intolerance?

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What Is Sucrose Intolerance Caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID)?

What is it about sugar and some starches that can wreak havoc on some kids? Often, it’s because these kids have a rare inherited disorder called Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID). CSID causes sugar intolerance; so when kids with CSID eat foods with sugars in them, they wind up with some very unpleasant symptoms.

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Normal Intestine

CSID Intestine

CSID intestine

Normal Intestine

CSID Intestine

CSID intestine

Helping Children Cope with CSID

Children of all ages have to learn to live with CSID. The more you know, the better you’re able to help them cope throughout their young lives. Click on Toddler, School-Age Kids, or Tweens and Teens to find out more.

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Toddlers
School-Aged KidSchool-Aged Kid
School-Age Kids

What Are the Signs and Symptoms?

Is your child experiencing all or any of the following symptoms: chronic diarrhea, chronic abdominal pain, and gassiness? Take the quiz to find out if they have signs of CSID.

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Kids Eat a Lot of Carbohydrates

It’s amazing that a healthy diet for kids over two years old should include 50% to 60% of calories coming from carbohydrates – good carbohydrates.1 Unfortunately, lacking the sucrase and isomaltase enzymes, kids with CSID have difficulty digesting both good and bad carbs.

Kids Eat a Lot of Carbohydrates

It’s amazing that a healthy diet for kids over two years old should include 50% to 60% of calories coming from carbohydrates – good carbohydrates.1 Unfortunately, lacking the sucrase and isomaltase enzymes, kids with CSID have difficulty digesting both good and bad carbs.

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REFERENCES
References
  1. Benton JM. Carbohydrates and sugar. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/sugar.html. Last updated January 2019. Accessed March 12, 2020.
  2. USDA Agricultural Research Service. What We Eat in America, NHANES 2015-2016. Table 1. Posted 2018. Accessed December 17, 2019. www.ars.usda.gov/arsuserfiles/80400530/pdf/1516/table_1_nin_gen_15.pdf
  3. USDA Economic Research Service. Average daily intake of food by food source and demographic characteristics, 2015–16 and 2017–18. Last updated April 1, 2021. Accessed December 17, 2019. www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/DataFiles/50590/food_table1.xlsx?v=3851.1
  4. USDA Economic Research Service. Dairy products: Per capita consumption, United States (Annual). Last updated September 30, 2021. Accessed December 17, 2019. www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/DataFiles/48685/pcconsp_1_.xlsx?v=8578.9
  5. University of Minnesota. Nutrition Data System for Research. 2018 Nutrients per Food Report. Accessed December 17, 2019. Subscription-based website.
  6. Aqua-Calc. Calculate weight of generic and branded foods per volume. Accessed December 17, 2021. www.aqua-calc.com/calculate/food-volume-to-weight

Parent Stories

Sucrose Intolerance may be more common than you think.