About CSID

What Is Sugar Intolerance in Children?

Not too long ago, the medical community was not even aware of the term “Sucrose Intolerance.” In the 1960s, physicians and researchers discovered the rare disease termed “Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency” (CSID) resulting in Sucrose Intolerance. They learned that some kids lack the enzymes that break down sugars into fructose and sucrose, the major sources of energy for the body. Recently they have found the disease, while still rare, to be more common than was originally thought.

Learn About Enzymes to Learn About CSID

What Causes Sugar Intolerance in Children?

To know what causes Sugar Intolerance or Sucrose Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID), you first have to understand that the disease is rare and that it’s inherited.

Kids with CSID lack two special enzymes – sucrase and isomaltase – that aid in the digestion of sugars and starches, resulting in unpleasant gastrointestinal symptoms. Click on LEARN ABOUT GENETICS to find out more about this inherited disease.

Learn About Genetics

How High Are the Risks?

Because it is a rare, inherited disease, Sucrose Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) affects only a certain portion of the population. But if CSID runs in your family or the family of your partner, you might be concerned about the risk of your child inheriting the disease. Did you know that in some populations, such as Alaskan Natives, a low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diet may mask CSID symptoms?

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How to Help Kids Cope with Sugar Intolerance, an Invisible Illness

Because kids with CSID may not have outward signs, people involved in your child’s life sometimes can’t see Sucrose Intolerance.

Having to eat a restricted diet and suffering pain, discomfort, and sometimes embarrassment can be hard on your child, causing stress and anxiety. Here are ways to make your child’s life easier.

invisible illness

How to Help Kids Cope with Sugar Intolerance, an Invisible Illness

Because kids with CSID may not have outward signs, people involved in your child’s life sometimes can’t see Sucrose Intolerance.

Having to eat a restricted diet and suffering pain, discomfort, and sometimes embarrassment can be hard on your child, causing stress and anxiety. Here are ways to make your child’s life easier.

How Can You Help

What Are the Signs and Symptoms?

Is your child experiencing all or any of the following symptoms: chronic diarrhea, chronic abdominal pain, and gassiness? Take the quiz to find out if they have signs of CSID.

Take the Quiz

Allergy or Intolerance?

With the many different types of food allergies and food intolerances being diagnosed and treated today and with their symptoms oftentimes being very similar, how do you know whether your child has a sugar allergy or Sucrose (Sugar) Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID)?

Here’s how to tell a sugar allergy and Sucrose (sugar) Intolerance apart.

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Allergy or Intolerance?
Allergy or Intolerance?

How Can I Help My Toddler Adjust to Life with Sugar Intolerance?

Once toddlers have been diagnosed with Sucrose Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID), the road to helping them cope can be challenging. While it can be difficult for toddlers to express themselves and for parents and caretakers to understand what a toddler is feeling, you can take a number of steps to adapt to life with a sucrose-intolerant child.

Check out the tips and strategies that can make life easier for your child and your family. The good news is that an early diagnosis of CSID can help both your toddler and other members of your family adjust much more quickly to the changes that need to be made to address your toddler’s CSID.

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How Can I Help My Child Deal with Not Being Able to Eat Sugary Foods Classmates and Friends Eat?

What child growing up doesn’t want to be accepted by classmates and friends? Try to imagine what it must be like not to be able to eat birthday cake at a birthday party. What about all those carefully selected “healthy” foods in your child’s lunch box – so different from the sandwiches and cookies of fellow classmates? And worst of all, what happens if there’s an “accident” and your child is teased or bullied?

These are some of the realities your school-age child with Sucrose Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) faces every day. But there’s expert advice available so you can help your child cope with Sugar Intolerance.

How Can I Help My Child Deal with Not Being Able to Eat Sugary Foods Classmates and Friends Eat?

What child growing up doesn’t want to be accepted by classmates and friends? Try to imagine what it must be like not to be able to eat birthday cake at a birthday party. What about all those carefully selected “healthy” foods in your child’s lunch box – so different from the sandwiches and cookies of fellow classmates? And worst of all, what happens if there’s an “accident” and your child is teased or bullied?

These are some of the realities your school-age child with Sucrose Intolerance caused by Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) faces every day. But there’s expert advice available so you can help your child cope with Sugar Intolerance.

Keep Reading

How Can I Help My Tween or Teen Deal with Not Being Able to Eat Sugar?

Trying to raise tweens and teens in this electronic, social media day and age is hard enough without adding a chronic illness like Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID), resulting in Sucrose Intolerance. As your tweens or teens move away from your influence and reach out to peers for approval, it can become much more difficult to manage what they eat and if and when they take their medication.

The one fortunate aspect is that your tween or teen is more mature, better understands what having Sugar Intolerance means, and can learn to make adjustments more quickly. Keep reading to learn about strategies to help your tween or teen cope with CSID.

Keep Reading

Sucrose Intolerance may be more common than you think.